A Gluten-free Food & Travel Publication [Est. May 2018] Follow Us on
{"id":933478793263,"title":"New to Gluten Free? Here are 5 Things You Should Know","handle":"new-to-gluten-free-here-are-5-things-you-should-know","description":"\u003ch2\u003eby Hannah Hutchinson\u003c\/h2\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWith one decade of living a gluten-free life behind me, I finally feel like I can give guidance to those who are just beginning their journey. For the longest time, I wasn’t sure I had enough knowledge or experience to dole out information, but after reading terrible advice on the internet, and having helped some friends positively transition into a GF lifestyle, I now know I can provide some support, without handing out medical advice. With all of this experience behind me, these are the five things I think every gluten-free newbie should know.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCross-Contamination\u003c\/strong\u003e: The risk of cross-contamination is not a reason to not eat out or enjoy a meal at a restaurant or someone else’s house, but you should be prepared to ask questions and put your health first.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eFryer: Do you remember the pre-gluten-free days where when you ordered French Fries and got a bonus Onion Ring - exciting. Now not so much that is a sure sign of a cross-contamination nightmare. Before ordering fries (or any fried option) check to see if flour added to make crispy or cooked in a shared fryer with gluten-containing items.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eToasters: Do not use a shared toaster oven. However, if you must or want to toast some bread, I recommend the awesome toaster bags found on Amazon to help reduce crumbs flipping up on your bagel or toast.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePrep Space: Ask food workers to change gloves and use clean utensils. Some restaurants (for example Chipotle) will automatically create a clean prep area and change gloves when you mention you have a gluten-free allergy or are a Celiac.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOther People’s Kitchens: Have an open and honest conversation with your host about the need for anything gluten-free to be prepped and cooked in a clean environment. If concerned, offer to bring your own dish that you know you can eat.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSauces, Dips, and, Spreads: Having a separate knife is not enough you need a clean and uncontaminated jar or bowl. In my house, we have the gluten-free peanut butter and the everyone else peanut butter - same thing for butter, jelly, Nutella, etc. If you’re at a party, knowing that the dip will not have someone accidentally dip their pretzels into will keep you healthy and sane.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePro Tip: Consider investing in a Nima. The Nima, a relatively new device that fits in your hand can quickly (within 3 minutes) detect gluten in food. I have used when ordering delivery, at a friends apartment when they were unsure of ingredients, on a plane and with office snacks. This little guy is a life-saver literally.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hannah2_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533167359\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBeauty Products\u003c\/strong\u003e: It is not just what goes into your body but what goes on your body too. When I was first diagnosed, I heard from an older celiac that she had used a shampoo with wheat that had made her hair fall out which scared me into being conscious of the products I used and checking ingredients on all products I purchased. Recently though I went to a Soul Cycle class and used the shampoo in the locker room without a second thought. For the next couple of days my head was on fire (itching and burning like crazy!). It didn't dawn on me until I was back in the Soul Cycle locker room the next week and I took a look at the shampoo realizing, that there were three different wheat ingredients. This is not to say everyone has external symptoms or reactions, but making sure your hair, body and make-up do not contain gluten is essential.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHidden Gluten\u003c\/strong\u003e: Gluten can be found in some very weird places, so it's better to ask than regret later. I have seen gluten listed in dressings, chocolate, Potato Chips and more. Just because you think it should not contain gluten does not mean it is automatically safe. Reading the labels or asking the waiter is the only way to avoid the pain later. Some words that contain gluten, but are not the three biggies (Wheat, Barley, and Rye) include:\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMalted anything\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBran\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDurum Semolina\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSpelt\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSoy Sauce (Although there are GF versions!)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBouillon\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eHydrolyzed Vegetable Protein\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCaramel Coloring\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDextrin\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eModified Food Starch\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTriticale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eModified Food Starch (stay away unless it distinguishes corn or wheat)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eVegetable Gums\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eWheat-free does not equal Gluten-free\u003c\/strong\u003e: With labels touting “Wheat-free” but not gluten-free ree you still need to check the ingredients to make sure that no Rye or Barley is listed. The first week of being gluten-free I was so excited to find a cookie I could eat that al I saw was a proud “wheat-free” badge. In the car, I took a bite and shared with my mom who said “This taste like a real cookie - what is in it?” As I was reading the ingredients, I realized it contained barley and immediately opened the door of the car to spit the cookie out. Don’t be like me and always check to make sure it says gluten-free, not just wheat-free. Below is a list of safe and not-safe grains but is not a complete list so make sure to google anything you don’t recognize on an ingredients list.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSafe Grains List: \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eAmaranth\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBuckwheat\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eQuinoa\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTeff\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTempeh\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRice\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCorn \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUnsafe Grains List:\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eKamut\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSpelt\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBarley\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRye\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eWheat \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOats (unless certified gluten-free)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hannah1_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533167403\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFinally, DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THE WORLD\u003c\/strong\u003e! Just because you can’t eat a few things or have to change the way you think about food does not mean you have to lock yourself up in your pristinely clean gluten-free safe kitchen. You might need to do a little prep work, but you can travel, eat out with your friends and have regular holiday dinners.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTravel: When deciding where to go start looking at blogs and local Celiac sites to find restaurants and resources in the area. Print out gluten-free restaurant cards in a variety of languages.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEat Out: Research menus or call restaurants ahead of time to help you prepare questions or know what options are available. Googling reviews from other celiacs or gluten-intolerants is a great start, too. There are a number of restaurants near where I grew up, who helped to make sure I had safe options whenever I came in, just because I took the time to talk to them and educate them. \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eHoliday Meals: There are many great ways to re-create or modify your favorite family recipes to make them safe enough for you to indulge in. I have a wonderful family who decides to make every holiday meal 100% gluten-free, but if you don’t have that option, offer to bring a main dish and a dessert to the meal, cook in your own kitchen, or talk with your family about the need to have safe options at the holiday table.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hanna_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533139490\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eAbout the Author\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHannah was diagnosed with Celiac disease in 2008. She originates from Oklahoma and currently resides in Brooklyn, where she works as an Analyst for an advertising company. In 2017, she created \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/thatgfgirl\/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003e@thatgfgirl Instagram\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e where she connected with a community of gluten-free bloggers and Instagrammers who introduced her to new restaurants and foods.  Her \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/thatgfgirl\/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003eInstagram\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e platform allows her to share her photo collection of gluten-free food finds and inspires her to be a loud and proud Celiac advocate.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-08-01T16:02:40-07:00","created_at":"2018-08-01T16:04:49-07:00","vendor":"GlutenfreeGlobalicious Magazine","type":"GF Travel Foodies","tags":["Gluten-free","Gluten-free NYC","Gluten-free Tips","Gluten-free USA"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":9029189533743,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"New to Gluten Free? Here are 5 Things You Should Know","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/products\/hanna_jpg.jpeg?v=1543964050"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/products\/hanna_jpg.jpeg?v=1543964050","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003ch2\u003eby Hannah Hutchinson\u003c\/h2\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWith one decade of living a gluten-free life behind me, I finally feel like I can give guidance to those who are just beginning their journey. For the longest time, I wasn’t sure I had enough knowledge or experience to dole out information, but after reading terrible advice on the internet, and having helped some friends positively transition into a GF lifestyle, I now know I can provide some support, without handing out medical advice. With all of this experience behind me, these are the five things I think every gluten-free newbie should know.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCross-Contamination\u003c\/strong\u003e: The risk of cross-contamination is not a reason to not eat out or enjoy a meal at a restaurant or someone else’s house, but you should be prepared to ask questions and put your health first.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eFryer: Do you remember the pre-gluten-free days where when you ordered French Fries and got a bonus Onion Ring - exciting. Now not so much that is a sure sign of a cross-contamination nightmare. Before ordering fries (or any fried option) check to see if flour added to make crispy or cooked in a shared fryer with gluten-containing items.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eToasters: Do not use a shared toaster oven. However, if you must or want to toast some bread, I recommend the awesome toaster bags found on Amazon to help reduce crumbs flipping up on your bagel or toast.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePrep Space: Ask food workers to change gloves and use clean utensils. Some restaurants (for example Chipotle) will automatically create a clean prep area and change gloves when you mention you have a gluten-free allergy or are a Celiac.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOther People’s Kitchens: Have an open and honest conversation with your host about the need for anything gluten-free to be prepped and cooked in a clean environment. If concerned, offer to bring your own dish that you know you can eat.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSauces, Dips, and, Spreads: Having a separate knife is not enough you need a clean and uncontaminated jar or bowl. In my house, we have the gluten-free peanut butter and the everyone else peanut butter - same thing for butter, jelly, Nutella, etc. If you’re at a party, knowing that the dip will not have someone accidentally dip their pretzels into will keep you healthy and sane.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePro Tip: Consider investing in a Nima. The Nima, a relatively new device that fits in your hand can quickly (within 3 minutes) detect gluten in food. I have used when ordering delivery, at a friends apartment when they were unsure of ingredients, on a plane and with office snacks. This little guy is a life-saver literally.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hannah2_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533167359\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBeauty Products\u003c\/strong\u003e: It is not just what goes into your body but what goes on your body too. When I was first diagnosed, I heard from an older celiac that she had used a shampoo with wheat that had made her hair fall out which scared me into being conscious of the products I used and checking ingredients on all products I purchased. Recently though I went to a Soul Cycle class and used the shampoo in the locker room without a second thought. For the next couple of days my head was on fire (itching and burning like crazy!). It didn't dawn on me until I was back in the Soul Cycle locker room the next week and I took a look at the shampoo realizing, that there were three different wheat ingredients. This is not to say everyone has external symptoms or reactions, but making sure your hair, body and make-up do not contain gluten is essential.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHidden Gluten\u003c\/strong\u003e: Gluten can be found in some very weird places, so it's better to ask than regret later. I have seen gluten listed in dressings, chocolate, Potato Chips and more. Just because you think it should not contain gluten does not mean it is automatically safe. Reading the labels or asking the waiter is the only way to avoid the pain later. Some words that contain gluten, but are not the three biggies (Wheat, Barley, and Rye) include:\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMalted anything\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBran\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDurum Semolina\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSpelt\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSoy Sauce (Although there are GF versions!)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBouillon\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eHydrolyzed Vegetable Protein\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCaramel Coloring\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDextrin\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eModified Food Starch\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTriticale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eModified Food Starch (stay away unless it distinguishes corn or wheat)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eVegetable Gums\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eWheat-free does not equal Gluten-free\u003c\/strong\u003e: With labels touting “Wheat-free” but not gluten-free ree you still need to check the ingredients to make sure that no Rye or Barley is listed. The first week of being gluten-free I was so excited to find a cookie I could eat that al I saw was a proud “wheat-free” badge. In the car, I took a bite and shared with my mom who said “This taste like a real cookie - what is in it?” As I was reading the ingredients, I realized it contained barley and immediately opened the door of the car to spit the cookie out. Don’t be like me and always check to make sure it says gluten-free, not just wheat-free. Below is a list of safe and not-safe grains but is not a complete list so make sure to google anything you don’t recognize on an ingredients list.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSafe Grains List: \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eAmaranth\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBuckwheat\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eQuinoa\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTeff\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTempeh\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRice\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCorn \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eUnsafe Grains List:\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eKamut\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSpelt\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBarley\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRye\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eWheat \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOats (unless certified gluten-free)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hannah1_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533167403\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFinally, DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THE WORLD\u003c\/strong\u003e! Just because you can’t eat a few things or have to change the way you think about food does not mean you have to lock yourself up in your pristinely clean gluten-free safe kitchen. You might need to do a little prep work, but you can travel, eat out with your friends and have regular holiday dinners.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eTravel: When deciding where to go start looking at blogs and local Celiac sites to find restaurants and resources in the area. Print out gluten-free restaurant cards in a variety of languages.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEat Out: Research menus or call restaurants ahead of time to help you prepare questions or know what options are available. Googling reviews from other celiacs or gluten-intolerants is a great start, too. There are a number of restaurants near where I grew up, who helped to make sure I had safe options whenever I came in, just because I took the time to talk to them and educate them. \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eHoliday Meals: There are many great ways to re-create or modify your favorite family recipes to make them safe enough for you to indulge in. I have a wonderful family who decides to make every holiday meal 100% gluten-free, but if you don’t have that option, offer to bring a main dish and a dessert to the meal, cook in your own kitchen, or talk with your family about the need to have safe options at the holiday table.\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cimg alt=\"\" src=\"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0027\/9796\/1263\/files\/hanna_jpg_large.jpeg?v=1533139490\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eAbout the Author\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHannah was diagnosed with Celiac disease in 2008. She originates from Oklahoma and currently resides in Brooklyn, where she works as an Analyst for an advertising company. In 2017, she created \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/thatgfgirl\/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003e@thatgfgirl Instagram\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e where she connected with a community of gluten-free bloggers and Instagrammers who introduced her to new restaurants and foods.  Her \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/thatgfgirl\/\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003eInstagram\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e platform allows her to share her photo collection of gluten-free food finds and inspires her to be a loud and proud Celiac advocate.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}

New to Gluten Free? Here are 5 Things You Should Know

by Hannah Hutchinson

With one decade of living a gluten-free life behind me, I finally feel like I can give guidance to those who are just beginning their journey. For the longest time, I wasn’t sure I had enough knowledge or experience to dole out information, but after reading terrible advice on the internet, and having helped some friends positively transition into a GF lifestyle, I now know I can provide some support, without handing out medical advice. With all of this experience behind me, these are the five things I think every gluten-free newbie should know.

Cross-Contamination: The risk of cross-contamination is not a reason to not eat out or enjoy a meal at a restaurant or someone else’s house, but you should be prepared to ask questions and put your health first.

  • Fryer: Do you remember the pre-gluten-free days where when you ordered French Fries and got a bonus Onion Ring - exciting. Now not so much that is a sure sign of a cross-contamination nightmare. Before ordering fries (or any fried option) check to see if flour added to make crispy or cooked in a shared fryer with gluten-containing items.
  • Toasters: Do not use a shared toaster oven. However, if you must or want to toast some bread, I recommend the awesome toaster bags found on Amazon to help reduce crumbs flipping up on your bagel or toast.
  • Prep Space: Ask food workers to change gloves and use clean utensils. Some restaurants (for example Chipotle) will automatically create a clean prep area and change gloves when you mention you have a gluten-free allergy or are a Celiac.
  • Other People’s Kitchens: Have an open and honest conversation with your host about the need for anything gluten-free to be prepped and cooked in a clean environment. If concerned, offer to bring your own dish that you know you can eat.
  • Sauces, Dips, and, Spreads: Having a separate knife is not enough you need a clean and uncontaminated jar or bowl. In my house, we have the gluten-free peanut butter and the everyone else peanut butter - same thing for butter, jelly, Nutella, etc. If you’re at a party, knowing that the dip will not have someone accidentally dip their pretzels into will keep you healthy and sane.
  • Pro Tip: Consider investing in a Nima. The Nima, a relatively new device that fits in your hand can quickly (within 3 minutes) detect gluten in food. I have used when ordering delivery, at a friends apartment when they were unsure of ingredients, on a plane and with office snacks. This little guy is a life-saver literally.

Beauty Products: It is not just what goes into your body but what goes on your body too. When I was first diagnosed, I heard from an older celiac that she had used a shampoo with wheat that had made her hair fall out which scared me into being conscious of the products I used and checking ingredients on all products I purchased. Recently though I went to a Soul Cycle class and used the shampoo in the locker room without a second thought. For the next couple of days my head was on fire (itching and burning like crazy!). It didn't dawn on me until I was back in the Soul Cycle locker room the next week and I took a look at the shampoo realizing, that there were three different wheat ingredients. This is not to say everyone has external symptoms or reactions, but making sure your hair, body and make-up do not contain gluten is essential.

Hidden Gluten: Gluten can be found in some very weird places, so it's better to ask than regret later. I have seen gluten listed in dressings, chocolate, Potato Chips and more. Just because you think it should not contain gluten does not mean it is automatically safe. Reading the labels or asking the waiter is the only way to avoid the pain later. Some words that contain gluten, but are not the three biggies (Wheat, Barley, and Rye) include:

  • Malted anything
  • Bran
  • Durum Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Soy Sauce (Although there are GF versions!)
  • Bouillon
  • Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein
  • Caramel Coloring
  • Dextrin
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Triticale
  • Modified Food Starch (stay away unless it distinguishes corn or wheat)
  • Vegetable Gums

Wheat-free does not equal Gluten-free: With labels touting “Wheat-free” but not gluten-free ree you still need to check the ingredients to make sure that no Rye or Barley is listed. The first week of being gluten-free I was so excited to find a cookie I could eat that al I saw was a proud “wheat-free” badge. In the car, I took a bite and shared with my mom who said “This taste like a real cookie - what is in it?” As I was reading the ingredients, I realized it contained barley and immediately opened the door of the car to spit the cookie out. Don’t be like me and always check to make sure it says gluten-free, not just wheat-free. Below is a list of safe and not-safe grains but is not a complete list so make sure to google anything you don’t recognize on an ingredients list.

Safe Grains List: 

  • Amaranth
  • Buckwheat
  • Quinoa
  • Teff
  • Tempeh
  • Rice
  • Corn 

Unsafe Grains List:

  • Kamut
  • Spelt
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Wheat 
  • Oats (unless certified gluten-free)

 

Finally, DO NOT BE AFRAID OF THE WORLD! Just because you can’t eat a few things or have to change the way you think about food does not mean you have to lock yourself up in your pristinely clean gluten-free safe kitchen. You might need to do a little prep work, but you can travel, eat out with your friends and have regular holiday dinners.

  • Travel: When deciding where to go start looking at blogs and local Celiac sites to find restaurants and resources in the area. Print out gluten-free restaurant cards in a variety of languages.
  • Eat Out: Research menus or call restaurants ahead of time to help you prepare questions or know what options are available. Googling reviews from other celiacs or gluten-intolerants is a great start, too. There are a number of restaurants near where I grew up, who helped to make sure I had safe options whenever I came in, just because I took the time to talk to them and educate them. 
  • Holiday Meals: There are many great ways to re-create or modify your favorite family recipes to make them safe enough for you to indulge in. I have a wonderful family who decides to make every holiday meal 100% gluten-free, but if you don’t have that option, offer to bring a main dish and a dessert to the meal, cook in your own kitchen, or talk with your family about the need to have safe options at the holiday table.

About the Author

Hannah was diagnosed with Celiac disease in 2008. She originates from Oklahoma and currently resides in Brooklyn, where she works as an Analyst for an advertising company. In 2017, she created @thatgfgirl Instagram where she connected with a community of gluten-free bloggers and Instagrammers who introduced her to new restaurants and foods.  Her Instagram platform allows her to share her photo collection of gluten-free food finds and inspires her to be a loud and proud Celiac advocate.

 

 

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